Off the Shelf

3 09 2008

While democracy does need at least two parties to survive, those two parties may no longer be Democrat and Republican. Dems faced a long bitter battle this year and some revelations came out of it (New Democratic Party is already being carved out of the warring factions – made up of Feminist Dems, Green Dems, socially liberal Dems and anti-Iraq War Dems).

Protests and rallies continue to be on the rise, and more people are becoming more involved, actively and passively, in political campaigning. The fiscally conservative Republicans should think about joining the Dems, and let the progressive leftists migrate to the New party.

 
Read the Article at HuffingtonPost

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CNN’s Cafferty Paints PUMAs With Broad Brush

26 08 2008
DNC protesters outside the RBC meeting in May, 2008

DNC protesters outside the RBC meeting in May, 2008

The description of PUMA isn’t entirely accurate – PUMA grew out of the response to the DNC RBC meeting in May 2008. Their main point is boycotting Obama, not necessarily out of pure loyalty to Hillary or because they are closet republicans, but because of the mess with Florida and Michigan’s reduced delegates.

Because the decision to hold early primaries in those two states as well as the decision to punish those two states in that way (reducing delegates to half status, thereby effecitively eliminating half the voters in each state) was 100% out of the voters hands, a lot of them joined together to form PUMA.

They do not endorse any candidate, though most people were Hillary voters (and of course they would be – if you were a McCain voter then you weren’t affected by the RBC ruling, and if you were an Obama supporter then it worked in your favor).

I think other Hillary supporters, who don’t give a rat’s ass about Michigan or Florida, also joined because, well, they felt betrayed and needed an outlet. Kinda like Gore supporters in 2000, only this time (sadly and ironically) the role of Bush is being played by Obama.





We cannot stop a river’s flow, but we can guide it.

26 07 2008

The Obama and Clinton campaigns have generated more energy in their separate political bases than the last two presidential elections combined. We, the people in these campaigns, have created this great Democratic movement whose precise direction is the only disagreement. Most of us would have voted for the other Democratic candidate had ours not been in the running. But now we have alienated our strongest allies, which closely resembles Bush’s leadership style.

 

The energy and political will with which we now find ourselves the stewards should not be ignored. The Republicans will not win this election – we will lose it.

 

That is, if we try to stop this momentum we feel right now. If we try to stop the river’s flow.





“My mind is made up; I’m voting for McCain or not at all”

25 07 2008

The enemy (Obama) of your enemy (McCain) is your friend.

The enemy (McCain) of your enemy (Obama) is your friend.

Confused? Well, welcome to the conversation.

Survival of the Democratic Party requires healing the wounds of voters who supported Hillary Rodham Clinton’s campaign and continue to support her to this day.

It requires healing the wounds of those voters who felt disenfranchised by the DNC’s Rules and Bylaws Committee meeting in May 2008.

It requires healing the wounds of voters who saw in Barack Obama a political white knight, only to find he was as two faced as any other politician. We have the choice to act together while rallying separately.

Of course we cannot rest until the voices of these voters are once again heard by the leadership of the Democratic party. Of course we will not be bullied, brainwashed, or bossed into falling in line.

Our future remains ours, however, and we must choose whether we are remembered for our strife, or for our ability to shape our future.





Pandemonium Unleashed, Most Attractive

25 07 2008

It is important to have an oasis where one can gather their thoughts, lick their wounds, and regroup. We must respect the needs of those voters who have flocked to such places, because we know what they have endured not just these past few months, but these past few years. We all deserve to have a forum, a sounding board, where our voices feel necessary and welcome.

One thing we agree on is that the divisiveness – amplified by the willing enablers in the media – that threatens to tear the Democratic party apart is doing just that.

Many of us have been motivated to action by shared beliefs: that the current leadership of the Democratic National Committee has abrogated its responsibility to represent the interests of all Democrats in all 50 states; that they were misleading our party by selecting, not electing, a candidate for president in 2008; that we were being forced to choose between our communities and ourselves; that our voices, while audible, were not heard.

The challenge of our past remains the challenge of our future: Will we be one force, one people, with one common destiny — or not? Will we all come together, or come apart?

Prejudice and contempt, cloaked in the pretense of political conviction, are no different. They have nearly destroyed us in the past. They plague us still. These obsessions cripple both those who are hated, and of course those who hate, robbing both of what they might become. We cannot – we will not – succumb to the dark impulses that lurk in the far regions of the soul everywhere. We shall overcome them, and we shall replace them with the generous spirit of a people who feel at home with one another. Our rich texture of racial, gender and political diversity will be a godsend in the coming years. Great rewards will come to those who can live together, learn together, work together, and forge new ties that bind together.